Category Archives: Soup

Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (5 of 8)

Everyone should have some recipes in their go-to repertoire. Things you KNOW you can make that everyone will enjoy eating. Around here, the go-to staples probably revolve around Mexican food. Enchiladas? Hell yes. Tacos with homemade corn tortillas? Indeed.

My husband is a big fan of soups. I’ve learned to keep a few go-to soup recipes at hand (even though I am not a particular soup enthusiast). One flavor that goes over particularly well in our house, even with the kids is potato leek soup.

I think a good soup encompasses layers of flavor. Enriching the flavor of each ingredient can help to deepen the complexity of the final soup. For that reason, this potato leek soup includes oven-roasted potatoes, roasted shallots and roasted garlic. The potato still adds creaminess while the roasted shallots and garlic add a faint sweetness. The combination of flavors is delicious!

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (7 of 8)

Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup

Ingredients:
6 tablespoons olive oil
2 leeks, white and light green parts only, roughly chopped
4 medium shallots, peeled and sliced thinly
6 cloves garlic, peeled
4 large russet potatoes, peeled and roughly chopped into 1/2-inch cubes
6 cups vegetable broth
1 bay leaf
1 sprig fresh thyme, plus more for garnish if desired
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (6 of 8)

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Place the diced potatoes, shallots, and garlic in a bowl with 3 tablespoons of the olive oil, and a generous amount of salt and pepper. Toss until everything is well coated. Spread the mixture on a large rimmed sheet pan in a single layer. Roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes, until the potatoes are lightly browned and crisp. Flip twice with a spatula during cooking in order to ensure even browning. Remove from the oven and set aside until needed.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (2 of 8)

Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons of oil over medium heat in a large soup pot. Add the leeks and cook, stirring regularly, until soft and wilted, about 10 minutes. Adjust the heat as necessary so as not to brown.

Add the potato/shallot/garlic mixture, broth, bay leaf, thyme, salt and pepper to pot and bring to a boil. Cover and turn the heat down to low. Simmer for 15 minutes, or until the potatoes are very soft.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (3 of 8)

Remove the thyme sprig and bay leaves, then purée the soup with a hand-held immersion blender or work in batches in a high-speed blender, until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. If the soup is too thick, add water or more broth to thin it out to your liking. Gently bring back up to temperature and serve hot.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (4 of 8)

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegan Roasted Potato and Leek Soup (8 of 8)

Bangkok Curry Noodle Bowls with Crisp Baked Tofu

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (11 of 11)

Some things I’ve enjoyed about the past few weeks: The stretches of days where we’ve had sunshine and weather warm enough to trick you into thinking Spring’s closer than it is. Slow walks through downtown, mostly to the grocery store. Our two old dogs, who are nearing the end of their days, following me around throughout the day then laying right under my feet later as I try to prepare dinner. Stretching homemade pizza dough into very OCD pizza rounds. Unintentional lazy weekend days (Sundays, after long sports-filled Saturdays). Not bothering to brush my every-growing-ridiculously-long hair for days at a time (messy buns to the rescue!). The rain we’ve suddenly been getting, with the threat of more rain and potential snow this weekend… Bowls of noodles.

Bowls of noodles of any sort are my go-to comfort food. Mac and cheese, ramen/saimin, cold udon or soba noodles… The following recipe is soup-like, but heavy on the noodle-to-soup ratio. The sauce is creamy, delicious, not overly spicy, but super flavorful. If you want things a little spicier, you can certainly add your desired amount of chili-garlic sauce!

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (8 of 11)

Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Baked Tofu

Serves 8-10 people.

Ingredients:

For the Tofu:
15.5 ounces extra firm tofu
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup light brown sugar
1/2 tsp gochujang (I prefer Mother in Law’s 00 Fermented Chili Paste)

For the Coconut Curry Sauce:
2 tablespoon oil
3 shallots, minced
2 tablespoons fresh ginger, minced
4 tablespoons red curry paste
2 14-ounce cans regular coconut milk
1 cup No-Chicken (or vegetable broth)
4 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons gochujang
6 tablespoons soy sauce

For the Bowls:
12 ounces brown rice noodles
2 tablespoon oil
half an onion, chopped thinly
2 cups chopped broccoli florets
1 cup shredded carrots
2 cups chopped asparagus
2 cups shredded purple cabbage
black sesame seeds for topping
limes for serving
a handful of fresh thai basil for serving

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (9 of 11)

Directions:

Prepare the tofu: Drain tofu about an hour before you want to prepare your meal. Roll the tofu in an absorbent towel several times and then place something heavy on top to press. I use a pot on top of a cutting board and sometimes add something to the pot to add more weight. Do this for 30 minutes.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (1 of 11)

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. While the oven preheats, cut the tofu into bite size cubes. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the sesame oil, minced garlic, soy sauce, brown sugar and gochujang. Gently toss the tofu in the mixture. Place the tofu on a nicely/generously oiled baking sheet, arranged in a single layer. Bake for 30-40 minutes until the tofu is nicely brown and crisp on the outside. Remove from the oven and set aside until needed.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (3 of 11)

Prepare the noodles: soak the noodles in a bowl of cold water for at least 20 minutes, until they’re soft. Drain and rinse. Set aside until needed.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (2 of 11)

Prepare the sauce: heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the shallots and ginger; stirring around for 3-5 minutes. Add the curry paste; cook for 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, sugar, gochujang, and soy sauce. Simmer for 15 minutes or so while you prep the rest of the ingredients – it should thicken slightly.

In a large skillet or wok, heat the remaining two tablespoons oil over high heat. Add the onion, carrots, broccoli, and asparagus. Stir fry for about 5 minutes until the broccoli and asparagus are bright green and just slightly tender. Add the noodles and baked tofu, tossing them around with the vegetables. Add the sauce and toss together until just combined (if you cook it too long at this point, the noodles can get overly sticky).

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (4 of 11)

Prepare the bowls: serve bowls topped with the purple cabbage and sesame seeds, along with a squeeze of lime and chopped basil leaves. Enjoy!

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (7 of 11)

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (5 of 11)

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (6 of 11)

Forbidden Rice Blog | Bangkok Curry Noodles with Crisp Tofu (10 of 11)

Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup (1 of 8)

Portuguese bean soup is a Hawai’i cold weather staple (of course “cold weather” means temperatures in the high 50’s or so, not like Oregon cold). The traditional version of this soup is meaty and filled with ham hocks, linguica (Portuguese sausage), kidney beans and potatoes. In Hawai’i, Portuguese bean soup is often served with, or over, steamed white rice. It’s flavorful, rich, and filling. There are many variations of the soup and it’s probably safe to say that most families in the islands have some version of this soup in their recipe repertoire that is unique to their own family.

This vegetarian version uses vegan longaniza (this one) rather than traditional Portuguese sausage. The addition of liquid smoke helps to give the soup a slight smokiness that the ham hocks would generally create. This soup will get quite thick; you can thin it with more broth or water if you prefer.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup (3 of 8)

Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup

Serves 10-12

Ingredients:
4 cups cooked kidney beans
2 large russet potatoes, peeled and cut in bite-size cubes
3 large carrots, peeled and diced bite-size
1/4 cup olive oil
1 medium red onion, peeled and diced
12 ounces vegetarian longaniza (or soyrizo), plastic casing removed
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 stalks celery, diced
1 teaspoon Chinese 5 spice
16 ounces crushed tomatoes
16 ounces tomato sauce
6 cups No-Chicken broth
1 cup elbow macaroni (dried)
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
salt and pepper to your liking

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup (7 of 8)

Directions:

In a large stock pot, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the diced onion and cook until translucent. Add the garlic, celery, and longaniza. Sauté until the linguica slightly crisps and browns (5-7 minutes).

Add the beans, potatoes, carrots, Chinese 5 spice, crushed tomatoes, tomato sauce and broth to the pot. Stir to combine everything. Bring to a low boil, then add in the macaroni, liquid smoke, and bay leaf. Reduce heat to low and cook until the vegetables are tender and the pasta is cooked (1 to 1 1/2 hours). *If the soup is thicker than you like, you can add more broth or water to thin it out.

Taste, then add more salt or pepper to your liking. Serve with steamed white rice.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup (6 of 8)

Forbidden Rice Blog | Vegetarian Portuguese Bean Soup (2 of 8)

Meatless Monday: Veggie Chowder

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday  Veggie Chowder

It’s mid September. Is that too early for soup? Just a few days ago Southern Oregon temperatures still reached the triple digits. The next few days, we aren’t expecting temps out of the 60’s. Can we say Fall is here?

Soup never screams excitement to me. It’s a comfort food. Maybe it’s a lot of boring standing around in front of the stove stirring chunks of vegetables together. Maybe you like that kind of thing. I won’t judge you.

Soup’s a transporter of the seasons, wanted or not. The following chowder is comforting, hearty, quite easy to throw together and a good Fall or Winter basic soup staple.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday  Veggie Chowder

Veggie Chowder

Serves 8-10 people

Ingredients:

1 stick butter
1 lage onion, diced
4 stalks celery, diced
6 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
5 cups whole milk
4 cups (1 quart) No-Chicken broth
4 large carrots, peeled and diced into 1/8-inch thick rounds
1 small head of broccoli, trimmed into florets and bite-size pieces
3 ears of fresh corn, trimmed off the cob (or roughly 2 cups frozen corn)
5-6 medium sized russet potatoes, peeled and cut in 1-inch cubes
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon dried dill
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper\
8 ounces extra sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
chives, chopped

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday  Veggie Chowder

Directions:

In a large stock pot, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until tender (5-6 minutes). Add the celery and garlic, cooking until fragrant (about 2 more minutes).

Sprinkle in the flour, being sure to coat all the vegetables. Cook for 1-2 minutes. Pour in the milk and broth, stirring well. Continue cooking until the soup begins to thicken (5-10 minutes).

Add in the carrots, broccoli, corn, potatoes, salt, dill, coriander and pepper. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook the soup until the potatoes and corn are tender (an hour or so). Taste and add more salt or pepper if you prefer.

Serve topped with sharp cheddar and a sprinkle of chives.

** If you want a thinner soup, feel free to add more broth or milk.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday  Veggie Chowder

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday  Veggie Chowder

Meatless Monday: Vegetarian Posole with Roasted Peppers, Pinto Beans and Soyrizo

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I suppose if you cook every day, it’s bound to happen.  I wonder if even the most illustrious chefs experience cooking burnout. Lately I’ve felt as though everything in my kitchen is some variation of just a few standby dishes and frankly, my tastebuds are tired of eating the same damn things.

When I find myself feeling this way, stuck in some cooking rut, my favorite way to get out is to challenge myself. I browse through numerous cookbooks, food blogs, and brainstorm recipes that I can concoct, play with, and experiment with to come up with non-boring food that my family will still enjoy eating.

The following soup was born out of all the above places.  It’s “Mexican food” but not (those terms carry a lot of value in our house!). It’s soup, it has never before made an appearance in my kitchen. It’s filling, warm, spicy without being overwhelming. We ate the entire pot in two days — which, when it comes to soup around this house — also means good things.

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Vegetarian Posole with Roasted Peppers, Pinto Beans and Soyrizo

Serves 8-10 folks (yields about 6 hearty quarts of soup)

Ingredients:
3 anaheim peppers
3 poblano peppers
10 large roma tomatoes, halved *
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large yellow onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 12-ounce tube of Soyrizo
1 medium zucchini, diced
1 25-ounce can of hominy, rinsed and drained
3 cups pinto beans, cooked
1 large carrot, peeled and diced
1 bay leaf
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons sea salt
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1/4-1 teaspoon ground chipotle pepper
5-6 cups No-Chicken or vegetable broth
the juice from 1 large lime
3/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

  • If you don’t want to roast your own tomatoes, use can use canned diced tomatoes (one 28-ounce can). I prefer the fire-roasted type.

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Directions:

Roast the peppers: If you have a gas stove, this is easily done by toasting the peppers over an open flame (on high), using tongs to turn the peppers constantly. Once the peppers are nicely blackened on all sides, place in a bowl and then tightly cover the bowl with plastic wrap. The trapped steam will soften the peppers and loosen their skins. After 15 minutes, pull the stems and seeds out of each pepper. Pull the skins off the pepper. You can also use a paper towel to rub off the loosened skins.

If you are using an oven, turn it on to the broiler setting. Brush each pepper with 1-2 teaspoons of vegetable, sunflower, or another high-smoke point oil. Arrange the peppers on a baking sheet, then place the sheet on the highest rack in your oven. Keeping a close eye on the peppers, remove them once dark, blackened spots appear. As with stove-top roasted peppers, place in a bowl and cover for 15 minutes. Remove the skin and seeds.

Dice the roasted peppers into small bite-sized pieces.

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Roast the tomatoes: Move an oven rack to the highest position in the oven and turn on your broiler. Gently squeeze each halved tomato, releasing some of the gelatinous seeds and juices. Line a large sheet pan with raised sides, with foil. Place each halved tomato cut-side down.

Broil the tomatoes until the skins are blistered and slightly blackened. Rotate the pan a few times for even roasting. This should take 5-10 minutes. Let the tomatoes sit until cool enough to handle and then peel the skins off. Dice each tomato half into four chunks.

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Prepare the soup: In a large stock pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the diced onions and saute until translucent. Add the minced garlic and Soyrizo. Cook until the Soyrizo starts to brown (5 minutes or so). Add the diced roasted peppers, stirring to combine everything. Cook for 2-3 minutes.

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Add the zucchini, hominy, beans, carrots, bay leaf, oregano, cumin, salt, coriander,  and chipotle pepper. Stir well. Add the broth, again stirring to mix everything together. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered for 45 minutes – 1 hour (longer if you want!).

Right before you’re ready to serve the soup, stir in the lime juice and chopped cilantro. This soup is particularly delicious when served with warm corn tortillas, sour cream, chopped cilantro, lime, and/or shredded cheddar cheese.

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