Tag Archives: Mexican

Meatless Monday: Queso Fundido Con Soyrizo

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday: Queso Fundido Con Soyrizo

The first time I saw queso fundido on a menu, I thought it was nearly too good to be true. A dish filled with melty cheese whose only purpose is to be eaten? It’s the stuff dreams are made of. It’s also one of my weaknesses and I can’t/won’t apologize!

The first time I made queso fundido, I loaded it up with freshly roasted poblano peppers and we demolished the entire thing in one sitting with a bunch of tortilla chips. The poblanos had a subtle smokiness without being overly spicy.

This queso is layered with nicely spicy vegetarian chorizo. There are numerous brands of soy chorizo, but my preference is actually Trader Joe’s brand. You can eat the queso with warm corn tortillas or use tortilla chips to enjoy it as a warm, cheesy dip. (Really if you’re feeling more keen on eating it by the spoonful, I wouldn’t thwart your endeavors.)

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday: Queso Fundido Con Soyrizo

Meatless Monday: Queso Fundido Con Soyrizo

Serves 6-8 people.

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 a large onion, diced
12 ounces Soyrizo
1 7-ounce can diced green chiles
8 ounces monterey jack cheese, shredded
16 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
1/2 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
2 large roma tomatoes, diced

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday: Queso Fundido Con Soyrizo

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. Heat the oil in a 10-inch cast iron pan over medium-high heat. Add the diced onion and sauté just until the onion soften and becomes fragrant. Crumble in the soyrizo and cook, occasionally stirring, until the soyrizo browns (8-10 minutes). Add in the green chiles and sauté for an additional minute or so.

Scoop out half of the soyrizo mixture and place in a small bowl until needed. Sprinkle on half of the cheese over the remaining soyrizo that’s in the pan. Layer on the soyrizo that you removed, over this layer of cheese, followed by the remaining shredded cheese.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, until bubbly and golden brown on top. Sprinkle on the diced tomato and cilantro, then serve immediately, with warm tortillas or chips.

Forbidden Rice Blog | Meatless Monday: Queso Fundido Con Soyrizo

Roasted Poblano Guacamole

I kick myself every single time I need to buy an avocado. There are numerous foods in Hawaii that I miss incredibly much all the time, but one in particular I never expected to miss, let alone crave, are the gigantic avocadoes we so readily had available in our backyard. The avocadoes I find here in Southern Oregon are so little, often far from ripe when I need them to be, and expensive especially when attempting the organic route. So it goes. Avocadoes are full of fiber, folate, potassium, vitamins, and though a bit high in calories, I never worry about it because generally, we eat pretty healthily and the calories are coming from good fat.

I love guacamole. Once while on vacation with my husband in Vegas, we went out for Mexican food, where we were told multiple times to order the guacamole, simply because of the elaborate preparation that came with it table-side. A guacamole spectacle? Who can resist? Our server showed up with a large tray: ripe avocadoes pitted but still in their skins, tiny bowls filled with cilantro, chopped onions, diced tomatoes, diced jalapeños, fresh limes, salt and pepper. In two minutes, tops, we had a huge bowl of freshly prepared guacamole and hot tortilla chips sitting in front of us. It was divine and made me vow to only eat guacamole prepared equally as fresh.

My husband is an avid fan of poblano peppers. Roasted, in sauces, in tamales or enchiladas. He just told me he’d love a poblano margarita. I love the flavor roasted poblano peppers offer: smokey, but not overly spicy. The smokiness in the adobo sauce that I like in this guacamole works with the roasted peppers as well, balanced with the creamy avocado. This guacamole is delicious on its own, or on tacos, wrapped in a burrito. You can’t go wrong, really.

 

 

Roasted Poblano Guacamole

Ingredients:

5 ripe avocadoes
2 poblano peppers, roasted and peeled
2 cloves garlic
¼ cup fresh cilantro, minced
1 tbsp. onion, grated fine
1 tbsp. adobo sauce *
1 lime
salt and pepper, to taste

* Canned chipotle peppers are often stored in adobo sauce. Smokey in flavor, this is a great addition to this guacamole. You can incorporate a chipotle pepper as well, for added smokey, peppery flavor. If you just use the one tablespoon of sauce in this recipe, you can puree the remaining peppers in sauce, then freeze for later use (approximately one tablespoon of puree is the equivalent of one whole pepper).

 

Directions:

In the small bowl of your food processor, or in a blender, combine the roasted poblano peppers, two of the avocadoes, and the garlic. Pulse until creamy and smooth (1-2 minutes). Transfer the blended mixture to a large bowl. Add the remaining avocadoes and mash until very few chunks of avocado are visible. I use a potato masher to do this – if you don’t have one, you can use a fork, wooden spoon, two butter knives, etc. Add in the grated onion, adobo sauce, and the juice from your lime. Stir until well incorporated. Taste, then add salt and pepper to your liking.

Serve immediately (the longer the guacamole sits before serving, the more brown it will get), either as a side dish, dip, or to go with tacos, burritos, etc.

Homemade Horchata

Let’s talk beverages. I enjoy good drinks. Not always of the inebriant variety, although living in the Pacific Northwest means that delicious, unique microbrews are vastly available. And beer aside, I have a soft spot for bourbon. And gin. And good tequila. Okay, let’s stop there.

Beverages… right-o. Five years ago, my husband introduced me to horchata (or-CHAH-tah). Being the Mexican food king, I listened when he said I had to try this drink that was the perfect accompaniment to our veggie burritos. I’ve been hooked since, and in fact seek out horchata at every new taqueria we visit, always on the hunt for a good, creamy, nicely cinnamon-flavored horchata. Traditional horchata is merely rice, cinnamon, sugar, and water. Sometimes lime.

We travel to the Bay Area relatively often. There are taquerias all over the place, some better than others. The burritos are frequent, the horchata much anticipated. There’s a place in Sebastopol, California that has my favorite horchata of all time, Viva Mexicana – it’s the creamiest I’ve had, by far, and the perfect blend of cinnamon, sugar, rice. If you ever find yourself in the North Bay, this place is a must for the horchata. Plus the burritos and breakfast items are delicious.

The following recipe isn’t traditional, as I’ve included almonds, vanilla, and milk. But it makes for a creamy, sweet, delicious drink. I know I said I’m into non-alcoholic drinks as well, but I’ve also been intrigued by boozy horchata, which I’ve seen on drink lists in larger cities or fancy Mexican restaurants. So far I’ve not gone that route, but am certain I’m not missing out by enjoying my virgin horchata, straight up. You won’t be disappointed, either.

Horchata

Ingredients:

1 cup long grain white rice
¼ cup almonds
3 Ceylon cinnamon sticks
11 cups water
¾ – 1 cup sugar
1 cup half and half or whole milk
1½ tsp. vanilla extract
ground cinnamon for serving

 

Directions:

Place your rice, almonds, and cinnamon sticks in a large container or pitcher. Add the water. Soak for 8-10 hours (overnight) at room temperature.

Place the grains of rice, almonds, cinnamon sticks, and about half of the soaking water into a blender (don’t throw out the remaining water – it’s your horchata in the making!). Pulse for 20-30 seconds at a time, until the rice and cinnamon sticks are broken up (but not too small! The pieces of rice should be about 1/8-inch in length).

Pour the broken up grains of rice, almonds, cinnamon sticks and water back into the remaining soaking water. Stir thoroughly. Add in the sugar, vanilla, and milk/half and half, stirring again. Refrigerate for an hour or two, until cold.

Strain out all of the rice, cinnamon stick, and almond pieces. Stir well. Serve over ice and sprinkle a little ground cinnamon on the top of each glass before serving (if you want… you know, for aesthetic purposes).

The horchata will keep in the fridge for a few days. Separation will happen, which isn’t a big deal – just stir before pouring.